Toy Making project Toy play grows healthy children

Medical students Benedetta (26), Aoife (25) and Svea (25) are committed to helping South African children who are in hospital due to illness, especially malnutrition. 

An essential part of their treatment and recovery is psychosocial stimulation, given by playing with toys. 

9021 Euro is needed to integrate toy play into the treatment of hospitalised children in South African. Are you going to help the health pioneers Benedetta, Svea and Aoife?

All donations will go entirely towards the project. 

Toy Making project Toy play grows healthy children

Medical students Benedetta (26), Aoife (25) and Svea (25) are committed to helping South African children who are in hospital due to illness, especially malnutrition. 

An essential part of their treatment and recovery is psychosocial stimulation, given by playing with toys. 

9021 Euro is needed to integrate toy play into the treatment of hospitalised children in South African. Are you going to help the health pioneers Benedetta, Svea and Aoife?

afrika

All donations will go entirely towards the project. 

The healthpioneers Benedetta, Svea and Aoife's Passion

Benedetta (26), Svea (25) and Aoife (25) are committed to enhancing care of critically ill children.

They do this as medical students in Groningen, and as healthpioneers in KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. Play is critical to childrens’ development whilst in the hospital and to support their recovery. Unfortunately this aspect of care receives  little attention which is why our health pioneers designed the "Toy Making" program that educates health-care professionals and caregivers about the importance of play and teaches them how to make toys from recycled materials.

A grant of 9.021 Euros will support the "Toy Making" program in five hospitals in KwaZulu-Natal. In this way at least 160 children every month will have play as an integral part of their treatment plan.  Consequently, their chances of a brighter future will improve.

Watch their video on the Toy Making project

Donate from the heart, make an impact with your gift. 

Toy Making Project

Budget GRASPPrice
Instruction booklet for paediatricians, nurses and caregivers (180 stuks)€3.200
Toy Making Workshop training program (24 x)€1.975
Craft material box for the hospitals with which the parents can make toys (in total 5 hospitals).€1.350
Craft material box for the parents to make toys at home (960 pieces)€2.496
total€9.021

"For the best start in life"

Playing is fundamental for a child's development. Especially in the case of sick children, because, whilst in hospital, their development is compromised.

In South Africa one in 4 children is malnourished resulting in the many thousands of hospitalisations each year of under five year olds.  These children are at risk of developing long-term mental impairment due to their environment.  Although they receive appropriate medical interventions whilst in hospital, the provision of structured play therapy is often absent. Without toy-play the chances of a healthy future are reduced.

To counteract this effect in the short and longer term, Benedetta, Svea and Aoife developed the "Toy Making" program. With this program they teach parents and hospital workers in South Africa to play with the children under their care. Toy-play is essential brain food for these children and through play they grow healthier.

Benedetta, Svea and Aoife need 9,021 Euro to extend the project into 5 more settings. Help and donate too!

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Goal
Raised

Something as basic as toy play makes all the difference to a South African child in hospital

All donations will go entirely towards the project. 

My name is Benedetta. I am 26 years old and I study Medicine at the University of Groningen. I am currently in my last clinical internship and will soon be a doctor. During my studies I learned about the essential role of playing with toys for the development of children. The importance of toys is often underestimated. That is why I set up GRASP together with my colleagues. Our goal is to educate parents about the importance of playing with toys. In this way, we hope to contribute to improving the quality of life of children who are hospitalized.

Hi! I am Svea, 25 years old, and like Aoife and Benedetta, I study Medicine at the University of Groningen. When we got the chance to go to South Africa for our bachelor project, it was an eye-opener for me that the best projects arise from good teamwork! In the beginning everyone was skeptical about the workshops but in the end we succeeded together with all healthcare professionals to make the project a success, this was a great experience! Seeing how much this project positively changed the mood and attitude, including among parents, is the main reason I hope we get the chance to set up the Toy Making Project in as many other hospitals as possible!

Hi, my name is Aoife. I am 25 years old. Like Benedetta and Svea, I moved to Groningen in 2015 to study Medicine with a focus on Global Health. I strongly believe in the philosophy that if you have the privilege of helping others, this is your duty too! I want to use my privilege as a (near) doctor to work for equality in global health.

My name is Benedetta. I am 26 years old and I study Medicine at the University of Groningen. I am currently in my last clinical internship and will soon be a doctor. During my studies I learned about the essential role of playing with toys for the development of children. The importance of toys is often underestimated. That is why I set up GRASP together with my colleagues. Our goal is to educate parents about the importance of playing with toys. In this way, we hope to contribute to improving the quality of life of children who are hospitalized.

Hi! I am Svea, 25 years old, and like Aoife and Benedetta, I study Medicine at the University of Groningen. When we got the chance to go to South Africa for our bachelor project, it was an eye-opener for me that the best projects arise from good teamwork! In the beginning everyone was skeptical about the workshops but in the end we succeeded together with all healthcare professionals to make the project a success, this was a great experience! Seeing how much this project positively changed the mood and attitude, including among parents, is the main reason I hope we get the chance to set up the Toy Making Project in as many other hospitals as possible!

Hi, my name is Aoife. I am 25 years old. Like Benedetta and Svea, I moved to Groningen in 2015 to study Medicine with a focus on Global Health. I strongly believe in the philosophy that if you have the privilege of helping others, this is your duty too! I want to use my privilege as a (near) doctor to work for equality in global health.

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Benedetta, Svea and Aoife make a better world for children

"In a perfect world, all children are given a fair chance to grow up healthily. Playing is indispensable. Especially for children who are in hospital because they are malnourished or ill. We believe that every child has the right to play. Do you agree with us? Help our Toy Making project and donate today. Thank you!"

Playing with toys for a child’s health

The Toy Making Project makes learning to play part of the treatment of children and involves  parents and healthcare professionals. The project teaches toy making and play interventions through a tailored program. So far everyone who has been involved has seen the benefits.

GRASP piloted the "Toy Making" project in KwaZulu-Natal and had wonderful results. Parents were so enthusiastic that they themselves volunteered to give "Toy Making" workshops to other parents. Paediatricians and nurses were impressed with the impact of the program on the children’s recovery.  

Some of the advantages of the project is that it is not complicated, inexpensive and  has an immediate and sustained impact on the child, meaning that many children can be impacted in a short time period.  

5 hospitals are now participating. Next, the world!

Now we are rolling out the "Toy Making" Workshop in 5 hospitals in South Africa. Because it is so simple, the "toy making workshop" can be easily expanded to other hospitals in Africa. We hope that making toys and playing will become an integral part of the treatment of all children from poor backgrounds who have to stay in hospital for a long time. This is the first step of that movement!

At the Albert Schweitzer Fund, we call that an action by a true #Albert Schweitzer #Healthpioneer

Playing is indispensable

Play is an essential part of childhood and healthy growth and in this sense it is ‘mental food’. Play develops their brains and nourishes their well-being. Every child has the right to the opportunity to develop properly. Small children who are in hospital often lack this essential stimulation. While their illness or malnutrition is being treated, they become increasingly mentally malnourished over time. This compounds any existing social or developmentally disadvantages therefore they desperately need all the stimulus they can get.

Small children who are in hospital often lack the essential therefore miss this essential stimulation. While their illness or malnutrition is being treated, they become increasingly mentally malnourished over time. This compounds any existing social or developmentally disadvantages therefore they desperately need all the stimulus they can get. Benedetta, Svea and Aoife seek to provide such stimulation through their Toy Making Project. 

When children end up in hospital, playing should be part of their treatment.There is lots of evidence to show that children who were mentally stimulated and developed as a child are more likely to progress to higher education and experience greater employment success. This advantage extends into the next generation.

Toys for sick and malnourished children

Something as basic as playing makes all the difference to a hospitalized child in South Africa

With 9,021 EUR we can teach almost a thousand parents and care workers to play with the children under their care. The amount will be invested in instruction booklets, online training courses, workshops and boxes of craft supplies to turn used materials into toys.

The project will promote play as a regular part of the treatment of sick and malnourished children in four hospitals in Kwazulu-Natal.  Because the parents are involved in the programme and taught to continue the play interventions at home, the children will have an improved chance of healthy brain development.

We do it for the welfare of children in South Africa

Many South African children are vulnerable to malnutrition and disease

Kwazulu-Natal province is one of the poorest provinces in South Africa with high rates of childhood malnutrition and illness. Compounding this, the majority of children are not given ways to develop their brain’s consequently and are effectively mentally malnourished.

Playing is indispensable if the children are to grow up healthily

Food alone is not enough to grow up healthily, playing is indispensable to health growth because it supports brain development.  Play provides the mental nourishment through which a child's psychosocial development is promoted.

Play is essential nourishment for a child’s developing mind

Every child has the right to develop properly. Small children in hospital lack the stimulation they desperately need. While they are being treated, they become increasingly mentally malnourished over time, compounding existing levels of disadvantage.  Thus they desperately need all the stimulus they can get. GRASP offers this with their Toy Making Project.

Learning how to play with your child promotes the bond between parent and child. It teaches parents that they can improve their child’s prospects and demonstrates to them that they are important to their child's development and well-being. Making play part of the treatment ensures that children are less likely to relapse into malnutrition or illness.

Something as basic as playing makes all the difference to a South African child in hospital.

Will you help Benedetta, Svea and Aoife give malnourished and sick children in South Africa a chance to grow taller healthily? Then donate now!

Albert

Healthpioneers in the footsteps of Albert Schweitzer

Our namesake Dr. Albert Schweitzer was a health pioneer in Africa and an influential 20th century European. In 1952 he won the Nobel Peace Prize for his work.

Today's health pioneers continue his work.

A lot is changing in healthcare in Africa, but good health is still a challenge for too many Africans.

Simple, smart health initiatives from skilled people can mean an unimaginable amount. We call these knowledgeable people healthpioneers.